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This is the "Citation Styles" page of the "CITING SOURCES RESEARCH GUIDE" guide.
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This guide provides information on citing your sources in some of the most commonly used citation formats: APA, MLA, ASA and Chicago.
Last Updated: Apr 10, 2014 URL: http://libguides.richmond.edu/citingsources Print Guide RSS Updates

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Citation Research

  • Citation Research (ASU Libraries)
    This guide from ASU contains information on bibliometrics and tools, information, sources and tutorials used to evaluate the impact on scholar's work.
 

Quick Cite with EasyBib

Click link above for Registration

UR has a site license. Register for your free account to start creating your citations in APA, MLA or Chicago/Turabian.

EasyBib is a citation generator that includes over 50 types of sources!

Be sure to double-check your citations against the appropriate citation style guide whenever you copy them from a resource or generator, such as EasyBib.  These are tools, but they aren't perfect!

EasyBib tutorials and help

 Import your citations from EBSCO and other databases, including JSTOR, ProQuest and Gale...

Here's how for EBSCO -- this includes Academic Search and the other databases searchable through Find Articles:

  • Choose Export from your Ebsco Folder or an individual citation
  • Select Direct Export in RIS Format
  • Save the file (pay attention to where it goes)
  • Open EasyBib and login
  • Select BIBLIOGRAPHY – ALL 59 Options – Upload/Database Import (far left bottom)
  • Browse to find the file and RENAME IT with a name.txt extension
  • Choose if you want abstracts and if you want a new list or to append to an existing list
  • Select Import

Citing Sources - Getting Started

The tabs above for APA, MLA and Chicago/Turabian provide formatting examples for the most common types of print and electronic sources of information. If you need help constructing a citation for a publication type not listed, consult the appropriate style manual, a Reference librarian, or the Writing Center. The Writer's Web can help you with other stages of the writing process.

Styles of Documentation

Different fields of inquiry have developed different styles, or rules, of documentation. Fields in the humanities, like literature, religion, or philosophy, tend to prefer MLA style. History and some social sciences, like education, economics, or political science, prefer Turabian or Chicago style. Other social sciences and some sciences prefer APA.

You should consult with your professor to determine which style you should use for any project. There are whole books devoted to writing and documenting research reports in each of these styles. For details, you should refer to the following publications; there are copies of all of them on Reserve at the Reference Desk at Boatwright Library. To ensure that your citations conform to current practice, you should always use the most recent edition of any style manual. Scientific writing has many different formats, depending on the discipline.

      
     

    Why Cite?

     

    Reports of research and its findings are not considered valid and legitimate unless the researcher documents the resources and methods used to conduct that research. For a scientist, this entails a detailed account of materials and methods used in the lab or the field. For the social scientist, it may mean including copies of surveys, questionnaires, observations, or other methods used to gather information. For any researcher using verbal or graphic materials, regardless of the medium--print, Internet, film, photographic, microfiche, etc., it means indicating exactly what materials were used and what information came from which source.

    The purpose of this documentation is to allow other persons interested in the subject of the research to verify information or to carry the inquiry further. Accurately and completely documenting the sources of information used in a research report or essay is therefore essential to the scholarly conversation that is the whole purpose of research.

     

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